Quality Data

Quality data are measurements that reflect the level of care we provide. They allow us to continually assess our performance and seek ways to improve. This information reflects our commitment to greater data transparency in health care. Data transparency provides everyone with accessible, accurate, honest and clear information about the quality of care we provide at Bozeman Deaconess Hospital. Wherever possible, we compare our results to statewide and national standards. This helps you better understand how we perform compared to other hospitals.

Click one of the following links to view the quality results:

Heart Attack Data

Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given Aspirin at Discharge

Why is this important?

Blood clots can block blood vessels. Aspirin can help prevent blood clots from forming or help dissolve blood clots that have formed. Following a heart attack, continued use of aspirin may help reduce the risk of another heart attack. Aspirin can have side effects like stomach inflammation, bleeding, or allergic reactions. Talk to your health care provider before using aspirin on a regular basis to make sure it’s safe for you.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014.

Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given PCI Within 90 Minutes of Arrival

Why is this important?

The heart is a muscle that gets oxygen through blood vessels. Sometimes blood clots can block these blood vessels, and the heart can’t get enough oxygen. This can cause a heart attack. Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI) are procedures that are among the most effective ways to open blocked blood vessels and help prevent further heart muscle damage. A PCI is performed by a doctor to open the blockage and increase blood flow in blocked blood vessels. Improving blood flow to your heart as quickly as possible lessens the damage to your heart muscle. It also can increase your chances of surviving a heart attack. There are three procedures commonly described by the term PCI. These procedures all involve a catheter (a flexible tube) that is inserted, often through your leg, and guided through the blood vessels to the blockage. The three procedures are:

  • Angioplasty - a balloon is inflated to open the blood vessel.
  • Stenting - a small wire tube called a stent is placed in the blood vessel to hold it open.
  • Atherectomy - a blade or laser cuts through and removes the blockage.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 100% of 18 patients.

Percent of Heart Attack Patients Given a Prescription for a Statin at Discharge

Why is this important?

Statins are drugs used to lower cholesterol. Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that your body needs to work properly. Cholesterol levels that are too high can increase your chance of getting heart disease, stroke, and other problems. For patients who have had one or more heart attacks and have high cholesterol, taking Statins can lower the chance that they’ll have another heart attack or die.

This measure shows the percent of patients who had a heart attack who got a prescription for a Statin before discharge from the hospital. Patients who shouldn’t take Statins aren’t included in this measure.

Higher numbers are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 100% of 80 Patients.

Heart Failure Data

Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given ACE Inhibitor or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD)

Why is this important?

ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) are medicines used to treat patients with heart failure and are particularly beneficial in those patients with heart failure and decreased function of the left side of the heart. Early treatment with ACE inhibitors and ARBs in patients who have heart failure symptoms or decreased heart function after a heart attack can also reduce their risk of death from future heart attacks. ACE inhibitors and ARBs work by limiting the effects of a hormone that narrows blood vessels, and may thus lower blood pressure and reduce the work the heart has to perform.

Since the ways in which these two kinds of drugs work are different, your doctor will decide which drug is most appropriate for you.

If you have a heart attack and/or heart failure, you should get a prescription for ACE inhibitors or ARBs if you have decreased heart function before you leave the hospital.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given an Evaluation of Left Ventricular Systolic (LVS) Function

Why is this important?

The proper treatment for heart failure depends on what area of your heart is affected. An important test is to check how your heart is pumping, called an “evaluation of the left ventricular systolic function.” It can tell your health care provider whether the left side of your heart is pumping properly. Other ways to check on how your heart is pumping include:

  • your medical history
  • a physical examination
  • listening to your heart sound
  • other tests as ordered by a physician (like an ECG (electrocardiogram), chest x-ray, blood work, and an echocardiogram)

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 100% of 84 Patients.

Percent of Heart Failure Patients Given Discharge Instructions

Why is this important?

Heart failure is a chronic condition. It results in symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, and fatigue. Before you leave the hospital, the staff at the hospital should provide you with information to help you manage the symptoms after you get home. The information should include your

  • activity level (what you can and can’t do)
  • diet (what you should, and shouldn’t eat or drink)
  • medications
  • follow-up appointment
  • watching your daily weight
  • what to do if your symptoms get worse

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 97% of 64 Patients.

Pneumonia Data

Percent of Pneumonia Patients Given the Most Appropriate Initial Antibiotic(s)

Why is this important?

Pneumonia is a lung infection that is usually caused by bacteria or a virus. If pneumonia is caused by bacteria, hospitals will treat the infection with antibiotics. Different bacteria are treated with different antibiotics.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 91% of 66 patients.

Percent of Pneumonia Patients Whose Initial Emergency Room Blood Culture was Performed Prior to the Administration of the First Hospital Dose of Antibiotics

Why is this important?

Different types of bacteria can cause pneumonia. A blood culture is a test that can help your health care provider identify which bacteria may have caused your pneumonia, and which antibiotic should be prescribed. A blood culture is not always needed, but for patients who are first seen in the hospital emergency department, it is important for the accuracy of the test that blood culture be conducted before any antibiotics are started. It is also important to start antibiotics as soon as possible.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 94% of 98 patients.

Surgical Care Improvement/Surgical Infection Prevention Data

Percent of Surgery Patients Who Received Preventative Antibiotic(s) One Hour Before Incision

Why is this important?

Antibiotics are medicines to prevent and treat infections. Research shows that surgery patients who get antibiotics within the hour before their operation are less likely to get wound infections. Getting an antibiotic earlier, or after surgery begins, is not as effective. This shows how often hospitals make sure surgery patients get antibiotics at the right time.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of Surgery Patients Whose Preventative Antibiotic(s) are Stopped Within 24 Hours After Surgery

Why is this important?

Antibiotics are medicines to prevent and treat infections. While the likelihood of infection after surgery can be reduced by giving patients preventative antibiotics, taking these antibiotics for more than 24 hours after routine surgery is usually not necessary and can increase the risk of side effects such as stomach aches, serious types of diarrhea, and antibiotic resistance (when antibiotics are used too much, they will not work anymore.) There are exceptions – for example, where the surgical site has been contaminated (making the surgery not routine). Talk to your doctor if you have questions about how long you should take antibiotics after surgery.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of Surgery Patients who Received the Appropriate Preventative Antibiotic(s) for Their Surgery

Why is this important?

Certain antibiotics are recommended to help prevent wound infection for particular types of surgery. This measure looks at how often hospital surgical patients get the appropriate antibiotic in order to prevent a surgical wound infection.

Infections continue to be the main preventable complication of most surgical procedures. Antibiotics are medicines to prevent and treat infections. By following the standard guidelines for timing and giving you the correct antibiotic drug, hospitals can reduce your risk of getting a wound infection after surgery.

Hospitals can reduce the risk of wound infection after surgery by making sure patients get the right medicines at the right time on the day of their surgery. These quality measures show some of the standards of care.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 100% of 273 patients.

Percent of patients who got treatment at the right time (within 24 hours before or after their surgery) to help prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery

Why is this important?

Many factors influence a surgery patient’s risk of developing a blood clot, including the type of surgery. When patients stay still for a long time after some types of surgery, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis. A blood clot slows down the flow of blood, causing swelling, redness, and pain. A blood clot can also break off and travel to other parts of the body. If the blood clot gets into the lung, it is a serious problem that can sometimes cause death.

Treatments to help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings, or mechanical air stockings that help with blood flow in the legs. These treatments need to be started at the right time, which is typically during the period that begins 24 hours before surgery and ends 24 hours after surgery.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery

Why is this important?

Sometimes surgical patients need to have a urinary catheter, or thin tube, inserted into their bladder to help drain the urine. Catheters are usually attached to a bag that collects the urine.

Surgery patients can develop infections when urinary catheters are left in place too long after surgery. Infections are dangerous for patients, cause longer hospital stays, and increase costs.

This shows the percent of surgery patients whose urinary catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery. Research shows that most surgery patients should have their urinary catheters removed within 2 days after surgery to help prevent infection.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 96% of 390 patients.

Surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were kept on the beta blockers during the period just before and after their surgery

Why is this important?

It is often standard procedure to stop patients' usual medications for awhile before and after their surgery. But if patients who have been taking beta blockers suddenly stop taking them, they can have heart problems such as a fast heart beat. For these patients, staying on beta blockers before and after surgery makes it less likely that they will have heart problems.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 98% of 66 patients.

Patients having surgery who were actively warmed in the operating room or whose body temperature was near normal by the end of surgery

Why is this important?

Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections and other complications by keeping the patient’s body temperature near normal during surgery. Medical research has shown that patients whose body temperatures drop during surgery have a greater risk of infection and their wounds may not heal as quickly.

Standards of care say that patients should have their body temperature normal or near normal during the time period 30 minutes before the end of surgery to 15 minutes after anesthesia ended. This measure shows the percent of patients whose body temperature was normal or near normal within this time period.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of outpatients having surgery who got an antibiotic at the right time (within one hour before surgery)

Why is this important?

Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections. Standards for care say that surgery patients who get antibiotics within an hour of their surgery are less likely to get wound infections.

Getting an antibiotic earlier, or after surgery begins, is not as effective. This measure shows the percentage of patients who got an antibiotic in this time period.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 98% of 169 patients.

Percent of outpatients having surgery who got the right kind of antibiotic

Why is this important?

Hospitals can prevent surgical wound infections. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent wound infections for certain types of surgery.

Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery. This measure shows the percentage of patients who got the right antibiotic during surgery.

Higher percentages are better

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. 99% of 344 patients.

Preventative Care

Patients assessed and given influenza vaccination

Why is this important?

Influenza, or the "flu," is a respiratory illness that is caused by flu viruses and easily spread from person to person.

There are over 200,000 hospitalizations from the flu on average every year. An average of 36,000 Americans die annually due to the flu and its complications.

The best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu shot each year during the fall season. Because flu viruses change from year to year, it is important to get a flu shot each year.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Patients assessed and given pneumonia vaccination

Why is this important?

Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that is caused bybacteria or a virus and can spread from person to person. A cold or flu thatgets worse can turn into pneumonia.

Although antibiotics such as penicillin were once veryeffective at treating pneumonia, the disease has mutated (changed) so thesetreatments are not as effective. The best way to prevent pneumonia is to get aflu shot each year (as flu often leads to pneumonia) and frequently washingyour hands.

Those who are more at risk of getting pneumonia, such asyoung children, people over the age of 65, people with a chronic illness (suchas heart or lung disease or diabetes), or people who have had pneumonia before,should get the pneumonia vaccine. Ask your doctor when the best time to bevaccinated is for you.

Higher percentages are better.

The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Stroke Care

Ischemic stroke patients who received medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots within 2 days of arriving at the hospital

Why is this important?

Ischemic stroke patients should get medicine known to reduce death, disability and the risk of another stroke(known as Antithrombotic Therapy) while in the hospital.

Research shows that hospitals should start this medicine within 2 days of arriving at the hospital to prevent and treat clots and reduce the risk of complications from the stroke.

Serious complications caused by strokes include changes in thinking and memory; muscle, joint, and nerve problems; or difficulty swallowing or eating; or blood clots.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke who got antithrombotic therapy started within 2 days of arriving at the hospital.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who received treatment to keep blood clots from forming anywhere in the body within 2 days of arriving at the hospital

Why is this important?

Patients admitted to the hospital with ischemic stroke orhemorrhagic stroke are at increased risk of developing new blood clots in their veins that break off and travel to other parts of the body, like the brain or lung (also called Venous thromboembolism).

Research shows that hospitals should begin treatment to prevent new blood clots on the day of or day after these patients are arrived at the hospital.

Treatment can include medicine, medical devices, or tightly fitting stockings designed to keep blood from clotting.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke who either received treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after arrival at the hospital or had paperwork in their chart to explain why they had not received this treatment.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Ischemic stroke patients who received a prescription for medicine known to prevent complications caused by blood clots before discharge

Why is this important?

Patients admitted with an ischemic stroke are at risk for developing complications like another stroke even after discharge. These patients should get a prescription at discharge for a blood thinner that prevents complications like another stroke (called Antithrombotic Therapy.)

Serious complications caused by strokes include changes in thinking and memory; muscle, joint, and nerve problems; or difficulty swallowing or eating; or blood clots.

This measure shows the percentage of patients who were admitted with an ischemic stroke who were given a prescription for an antithrombotic before they were discharged from the hospital.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Ischemic stroke patients needing medicine to lower cholesterol, who were given a prescription for this medicine before discharge

Why is this important?

Cholesterol is a fat (also called a lipid) that the body needs to work properly. Levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) that are too high can increase the chance of stroke, heart disease, and other problems. Medicines called statins can help lower LDL cholesterol levels.

In patients with ischemic stroke who have high cholesterol, taking statins can help lower the chance of another stroke.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke who got a prescription for a statin before they were discharged from the hospital.

Patients who shouldn't take statins are not included in this measure.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients or caregivers who received written educational materials about stroke care and prevention during the hospital stay

Why is this important?

Educating patients with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke and their caregivers about stroke care and prevention helps patients’ live healthier lives and reduces health care costs.

During the hospital stay, hospital staff should give stroke patients and caregivers written information on:

  • How to activate the hospital emergency system
  • The importance of doing follow-up after being released from the hospital
  • Medicines prescribed at discharge
  • What increases the chance of stroke
  • Warning signs and symptoms of stroke

This measure shows the percentage of patients with an ischemic stroke or a hemorrhagic stroke or their caregivers who received written information about these topics during their hospital stay.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients who were evaluated for rehabilitation services

Why is this important?

Many ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke patients will experience moderate or severe disability, including problems with physical, speech and mental functions. Stroke rehabilitation can help patients relearn those lost skills and regain independence. Once the stroke symptoms and related problems are under control, the hospital appropriate health care professionals should review the status of the patient and begin rehabilitation as soon as possible. Appropriate health care professionals include physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and/or neuropsychologist. The earlier the patient starts rehabilitation, the better the recovery process.

Patients who need stroke rehabilitation may begin while they are still at the hospital and continue in a rehabilitation setting that is right for the patient. These options include inpatient rehabilitation units (either stand-alone or part of a hospital/clinic), outpatient units (usually part of a hospital/clinic), nursing home, or home-based programs.

This measure shows the percentage of patients admitted with an ischemic stroke or a hemorrhagic stroke who were evaluated for their need for rehabilitation services.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Blood Clot Prevention and Treatment

Patients who got treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after hospital admission or surgery

Why is this important?

Because hospital patients often have to stay in bed for long periods of time, all patients admitted to the hospital are at increased risk of

developing blood in their veins (also called venous thromboembolism, or VTE) that can break off and travel to other parts of the body, like the heart, brain, or lung.

Hospitals can prevent blood clots by routinely evaluating patients for their risk of developing blood clots and using appropriate prevention and treatment procedures.

Prevention can include compression stockings, blood thinners, and/or other medicines.

This measure shows the percentage of patients who received treatment to prevent blood clots:

On the day of or day after arrival at the hospital or

One the day of or day after having surgery

Patients who did not receive treatment may also be included in this measure, if they had paperwork in their chart to explain why.

Reasons for not receiving treatment may include having a massive wound, actively bleeding, or having an allergy to blood thinners.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Patients who got treatment to prevent blood clots on the day of or day after being admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU)

Why is this important?

Patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) are at increased risk for developing blood clots in their veins (venous thromboembolism, or VTE), because they are in bed for a long period of time. These clots can break off and travel to other parts of the body, causing serious harm.

Hospitals can prevent blood clots by routinely evaluating all patients for their risk of developing blood clots and using appropriate prevention and treatment procedures. Prevention can include compression stockings, blood thinners, and/or other medicines.

This measure shows the percentage of ICU patients who received treatment to prevent blood clots:

  • On the day of or day after arrival at the hospital, or
  • On the day of or day after transfer to the ICU, or
  • On the day of or day after having surgery

Patients who did not receive treatment may also be included in this measure, if they had paperwork in their chart to explain why. Reasons for not receiving treatment may include having a massive wound, actively bleeding, or having an allergy to blood thinners.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Patients with blood clots who got the recommended treatment, which includes using two different blood thinner medicines at the same time

Why is this important?

Patients who develop blood clots in their veins (also called venous thromboembolism, or VTE) need to get treatment that can break up the clots quickly and prevent others from forming.

The recommended treatment is to first give a blood thinner that can get into the bloodstream quickly through an IV or injection (heparin), then give a slower-acting oral blood thinner medicine (warfarin), and continue giving both blood thinners for 5 days or until it is safe for the patient to transition off of the IV blood thinner and use only the oral blood thinner medicine.

This measure shows the percentage of hospital patients who had a confirmed diagnosis of blood clot at hospital admission or during their hospital stay, and received both medicines for at least 5 days, or were discharged from the hospital on both kinds of medicine, unless their blood work showed they no longer needed it.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Patients with blood clots who were treated with an intravenous blood thinner, and then were checked to determine if the blood thinner was putting the patient at an increased risk of bleeding

Why is this important?

Patients who have been diagnosed with a blood clot(also called venous thromboembolism, or VTE) are usually treated with a blood thinner such as IV heparin.

Some patients may be prescribed a type of IV heparin called unfractionated heparin. Unfractionated heparin carries a higher risk of increased bleeding than a different type of IV heparin (calledlow molecular weight heparin). Risk for bleeding increases because blood thinners increase the time it takes your blood to clot. The most common signs of increased bleeding include unusual bruising, nosebleeds, and bleeding gums.

Because of their higher risk of bleeding, patients getting unfractionated heparin should be given regular blood tests to determine if they are at an increased risk of bleeding from getting the medication. This measure shows the percentage of patients who developed a blood clot at admission or during their hospital stay, treated with unfractionated IV heparin who had their blood checked using recommended procedures.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Patients with blood clots who were discharged on a blood thinner medicine and received written instructions about that medicine

Why is this important?

Patients who develop blood clots (also called venous thromboembolism or VTE) will usually be given blood thinner medicines to take when they leave the hospital.

Educating patients about how to take the medicine and its possible side effects can help prevent problems that could bring them back to the hospital. Before leaving the hospital, patients with a blood clot, who are taking a blood thinner medicine, and their caregiver should receive information about the following topics:

  • Compliance (how to follow medication instructions)
  • Diet (how to eat a healthy diet and avoid foods that interfere with blood thinners)
  • Monitoring their blood thinner medicine
  • Adverse drug reactions (difficulty breathing, vomiting, nausea)
  • When to call your health care provider (dizziness or weakness, a fall, bright red bleeding)

This measure shows the percentage of patients diagnosed with a blood clot (either at admission or during their hospital stay) discharged from the hospital on blood thinners (anticoagulants or anticoagulant therapy or warfarin therapy) who received written educational instructions at hospital discharge.

Higher percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Pregnancy and Delivery Care

Percent of newborns whose deliveries were scheduled too early (1-3 weeks early), when a scheduled delivery was not medically necessary

Why is this important?

Guidelines developed by doctors and researchers say it’s best to wait until the 39th completed week of pregnancy to deliver your baby because important fetal development takes place in your baby’s brain and lungs during the last few weeks of pregnancy.

Sometimes women go into early labor on their own, and early deliveries can’t be prevented. Sometimes, doctors decide that inducing labor or delivering a baby early by C-section (called "elective delivery”) is in the best interest of the mother and the baby. In these cases, early deliveries are medically necessary.

However, doctors may also decide to induce labor or deliver babies by C-section early as a convenience to themselves or their patient. This practice is not recommended. Hospitals should work with doctors and patients to avoid early elective deliveries when they are not medically necessary.

This measure shows the percent of pregnancy women who had elective deliveries 1-3 weeks early (either vaginally or by C-section) who early deliveries were not medically necessary. Higher numbers may indicate that hospitals aren't doing enough to discourage this unsafe practice.

Lower percentages are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2013.

Timely Emergency Department Care

Percentage of patients who left the emergency department before being seen

Why is this important?

Hospital emergency departments that have high percentages of patients who leave without being seen may not have the staff or resources to provide timely and effective emergency room care. Patients who leave the emergency department without being seen may be seriously ill, putting themselves at higher risk for poor health outcomes.

This measure shows the percentage of all individuals who signed into an emergency department but left before being evaluated by a healthcare professional.

Lower numbers are better.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems)

Percent of patients who reported that their nurses "Always" communicated well

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that their doctors "Always" communicated well

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that they "Always" received help as soon as they wanted

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that their pain was "Always" well controlled

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that staff "Always" explained about medicines before giving it to them

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that their room and bathroom were "Always" clean

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported that the area around their room was "Always" quiet at night

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients at each hospital who reported that yes, they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who gave their hospital a rating of 9 or 10 on a scale from 0 (lowest) to 10 (highest)

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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0%
The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Percent of patients who reported yes, they would definitely recommend the hospital

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “H-caps”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.

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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana, and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013.

Patients who "Strongly Agree" they understood their care when they left the hospital

Why is this important?

HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients. HCAHPS (pronounced “<em>H-caps</em>”) was created to publicly report the patient’s perspective of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients about important aspects of their hospital experience.The HCAHPS results posted on Hospital Compare allow consumers to make fair and objective comparisons between hospitals, and of individual hospitals to state and national benchmarks, on ten important measures of patients' perspectives of care.
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The rates displayed in this graph for national, Montana and top 10% hospitals are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013.